Installing Glassfish 3.1 on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS

by Nabi Zamani
April 29th, 2011

This tutorial will explain how to install a Glassfish 3.1 Server on an Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Server. It will also cover some but not all security concerns. The steps have been executed successfully on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Server edition (64-bit). I have tested everything by using Parallels Virtual Machines - you might want to use Virtual Machines as well. You can use this tutorial for setting up a Glassfish server which is reachable via internet for everybody. Both Ubuntu root servers and Ubuntu virtual servers should be fine for this tutorial, so you can choose any hosting package offered by the provider of your choice. In all cases you need to make sure to have root access to your server. You should also be familiar with the Unix/Linux command line because you will have to execute lots of commands on the shell. After having this tutorial completed you can use your new Glassfish installation to host your own Java EE 6 compliant applications.

In my previous tutorial I described how to install Glassfish 3.0.1 on both Ubuntu 8.04 and Ubuntu 10.04. I have received plenty of feedback directly posted on the page and even much more feedback from people who directly contacted me. It seems that my tutorial was quite helpful for many of my readers. Unfortunately I did not receive any donations yet - hopefully this will change soon with this tutorial.

I would like to take this chance to thank everybody who left comments and hints on my previous tutorial. Some of the hints have been incorporated into this tutorial. Keep posting your information and ideas here to improve this tutorial for others!


Table of contents:


Creating this tutorial meant a lot of effort - although I could reuse a lot of the work I invested into my previous tutorial. I hope it will help others. If you have any questions do not hesitate to contact me. Any feedback is welcome! Also feel free to leave a comment (see below). For helping me to maintain my tutorials any donation is welcome. But now enough words - enjoy the tutorial.


1. Setting up the OS environment

Before you start doing anything you should think about a security concept. A detailed security concept is out of scope for this tutorial. Very important from security point of view is not to run your Glassfish server as root. This means you need to create a user with restricted rights which you can use for running Glassfish. Once you have added a new user, let's say 'glassfish', you might also want to add a new group called 'glassfishadm'. You can use this group for all users that shall be allowed to "administer" your Glassfish in full depth. In full depth means also modifying different files in the Glassfish home directory. Below you find user and group related commands that you might want to use.

#Add a new user called glassfish
sudo adduser --home /home/glassfish --system --shell /bin/bash glassfish

#add a new group for glassfish administration
sudo groupadd glassfishadm

#add your users that shall be Glassfish adminstrators
sudo usermod -a -G glassfishadm $myAdminUser

#in case you want to delete a group some time later (ignore warnings):
#delgroup glassfishadm

Glassfish allows some of the configuration tasks to be managed via a web based Administration GUI. We will simply call it AdminGUI from now on. You can reach the AdminGUI by visiting http://www.yourserver.com:4848/ in your browser (please replace www.yourserver.com with localhost or where ever your Glassfish server is). As you can see port 4848 is used. Of course, we don't want anyone to access our AdminGUI. Therefore we have to restrict acces to the AdimnGUI. A way do this is to block port 4848 via the firewall. Anything you can do via AdminGUI is also available via the asadmin tool that ships with Glassfish. So you don't have to worry about not being able to configure Glassfish if you block the AdminGUI.

Usually you want to run Glassfish on port 80. But since we don't suggest to run Glassfish as root we cannot run Glassfish on port 80. But there are still ways to run Glassfish as a non-root user and still receiving http requests on port 80. One option could be mod_jk, but this would only be another component that needs to be managed. An easy way is to use a simple iptables redirection rule, that redirects requests on port 80 to port 8080 (http) and requests on port 443 to port 8181 (https).

You should make sure that you do not block other important ports, for example your ssh port which usually runs on port 22 (else you will be locked out). Changing the ssh port to some other is actually a good idea, but for now we will simply suggest your ssh port is 22. Another helpfull iptables rule related to your ssh port 22 is to slow down connection tries from an ip if they fail 3 times. I found a rule for that on the web and added it below. Although I will not mention it here you should also use other techniques and tools to secure your ssh port. Unfortunately, I did not get the time to post a tutorial about that.

Now we have created a lot of rules. You could enter them always one by one, but we don't want this kind of effort. I suggest to enter the following iptables rules in a separate file which contains all of our iptables related ideas we discussed so far:

#!/bin/bash

# ATTENTION: flush/delete all existing rules
iptables -F

################################################################
# set the default policy for each of the pre-defined chains
################################################################
iptables -P INPUT ACCEPT
iptables -P OUTPUT ACCEPT
iptables -P FORWARD DROP

# allow establishment of connections initialised by my outgoing packets
iptables -A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT

# accept anything on localhost
iptables -A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT

################################################################
#individual ports tcp
################################################################
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8080 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8181 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 443 -j ACCEPT
#uncomment next line to enable AdminGUI on port 4848:
#iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 4848 -j ACCEPT

################################################################
#slow down the amount of ssh connections by the same ip address:
#wait 60 seconds if 3 times failed to connect
################################################################
iptables -I INPUT -p tcp -i eth0 --dport 22 -m state --state NEW -m recent --name sshprobe --set -j ACCEPT
iptables -I INPUT -p tcp -i eth0 --dport 22 -m state --state NEW -m recent --name sshprobe --update --seconds 60 --hitcount 3 --rttl -j DROP

#drop everything else
iptables -A INPUT -j DROP

################################################################
#Redirection Rules
################################################################
#1. redirection rules (allowing forwarding from localhost)
iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -o lo -p tcp --dport 80 -j REDIRECT --to-port 8080
iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -o lo -p tcp --dport 443 -j REDIRECT --to-port 8181

#2. redirection http
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 8080

#3. redirection https
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp -m tcp --dport 443 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 8181


################################################################
#save the rules somewhere and make sure
#our rules get loaded if the ubuntu server is restarted
################################################################
iptables-save > /etc/my-iptables.rules
iptables-restore < /etc/my-iptables.rules

#List Rules to see what we have now
iptables -L

I suggest to create a file called iptables.DISABLE_4848.rules which contains exactly everything from the code box above. Then you could also create a file called iptables.ENABLE_4848.rules which has line 28 uncommented (everything else is just the same). Of course, you have to make both files executable with the command chmod +x $filename (please replace $filename). Then you can simply run one of the scripts when ever you want to disable or enable the AdminGUI on port 4848, i.e. sudo ./iptables.DISABLE_4848.rules

Please also do not forget that all your iptables rules should also be activated if your Ubuntu server is restarted. Otherwise you would have to remember to run you iptables rules manually after each restart. If you forget to run them all manually, or if you have simply forgotten that your server has been restarted, then your firewall is open for everyone. If you are lucky nothing will happen, if not you might get some successful instrusion attacks. Lines 58 and 59 will help you to make sure your rules are automatically loaded after each restart. But this is not everything for iptables configuration on startup. You also need to create a file at /etc/network/if-pre-up.d/iptablesload and one at /etc/network/if-post-down.d/iptablessave. For more information please have a look at the official Ubuntu help sites for iptables. The following two code boxes show the content of our two files. As you can see in both code boxes line 2 is refering to the file /etc/my-iptables.rules, which we have defined in line 58 and 59 of our files iptables.DISABLE_4848.rules and iptables.ENABLE_4848.rules respectively. I have added /sbin/ in front of the iptables commands (see below) because i was facing the problem that iptables commands without /sbin/ could not be found at the time when the files iptablesload or iptablessave were executed during the Ubuntu server startup process.

#!/bin/sh
/sbin/iptables-restore < /etc/my-iptables.rules
exit 0
#!/bin/sh
/sbin/iptables-save -c > /etc/my-iptables.rules
if [ -f /etc/iptables.downrules ]; then
   /sbin/iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.downrules
fi
exit 0

Finally you have to make sure that both files are executable. For that you only need to execute the following commands once.

sudo chmod +x /etc/network/if-post-down.d/iptablessave
sudo chmod +x /etc/network/if-pre-up.d/iptablesload

At this point you can try what happens if you reboot your Ubuntu server (sudo reboot). After Ubuntu has restarted just try sudo iptables -L on the shell. It should show you the rules we have defined. You should see something like this if you hit sudo ./iptables.DISABLE_4848.rules before rebooting:

Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination
DROP       tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:ssh state NEW recent: UPDATE seconds: 60 hit_count: 3 TTL-Match name: sshprobe side: source
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:ssh state NEW recent: SET name: sshprobe side: source
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            state RELATED,ESTABLISHED
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:www
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:ssh
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:http-alt
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:8181
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:https
DROP       all  --  anywhere             anywhere

Chain FORWARD (policy DROP)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

Your firewall settings are loaded automatically whenever Ubuntu is starting up. We can continue with the next steps. Please do not forget that these are only some minimum firewall settings. For maximum security you might need to add your own iptables rules.


2. Setting up Java

The next step is to set up Java. Glassfish requires at least JDK 6. It is certified with Sun JDK 6. So you really should install the latest Sun JDK 6. I suggest to remove the ObenJDK first if you have it installed and install the Sun JDK and JRE.


For Ubuntu 10.04 we need to add a new repository which includes the Sun JDK (see Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Release Notes for more details):

#remove OpenJDK if installed
sudo apt-get remove openjdk-6-jre openjdk-6-jdk

#maybe you have to execute this here first, else 
#add-apt-repository might fail
sudo apt-get install python-software-properties

#add new repository that contains sun java (see https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LucidLynx/ReleaseNotes)
sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ lucid partner"

#update to know about new repository
sudo apt-get update

#now install Sun JDK
sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jdk  sun-java6-jre

#get rid of several automatically installed packages that are not needed anymore
sudo apt-get autoremove

#optional:
#make sure environment points to a valid install if you are replacing...
#sudo update-alternatives --config java

#check JDK by looking in the /etc/alternatives/ directory
cd /etc/alternatives
ls -lrt java*

#setting JAVA_HOME globally for all users (only for bash)
#vim /etc/bash.bashrc
#append the following line:
#export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun

#setting JAVA_HOME for everyone (best place for setting env vars globally)
#see https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EnvironmentVariables for details
vim /etc/environment
#append the following lines:
JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun
#we will set this here because it might prevent problems later
AS_JAVA=/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun


3. Downloading and Installing Glassfish

Now we can download Glassfish. I suggest to switch the user now to glassfish, which we have created in the first step. We want to download the Glassfish zip installation file to /home/glassfish/downloads/. Afterwards the zip file has to be extracted and the content can be moved to /home/glassfish/ - this is everything needed for installing Glassfish. Usually the zip file is extracted to a directory called ./glassfish3/. Make sure to move the content of ./glassfish3/ and not ./glassfish3 itself to /home/glassfish/.
#if you dont't have "unzip" installed run this here first
sudo apt-get install unzip

#now switch user to the glassfish user we created (see step 1)
sudo su glassfish

#change to home dir of glassfish
cd /home/glassfish/

#create new directory if not already available
mkdir downloads

#go to the directory we created
cd /home/glassfish/downloads/

#download Glassfish and unzip
wget http://download.java.net/glassfish/3.1/release/glassfish-3.1.zip
unzip glassfish-3.1.zip

#move the relevant content to home directory
mv /home/glassfish/downloads/glassfish3/* /home/glassfish/
#if something has not been moved, then move it manually, i.e.:
mv /home/glassfish/downloads/glassfish3/.org.opensolaris,pkg /home/glassfish/.org.opensolaris,pkg

#exit from glassfish user
exit

#change group of glassfish home directory to glassfishadm
sudo chgrp -R glassfishadm /home/glassfish

#just to make sure: change owner of glassfish home directory to glassfish
sudo chown -R glassfish /home/glassfish

#make sure the relevant files are executable/modifyable/readable for owner and group
sudo chmod -R ug+rwx /home/glassfish/bin/
sudo chmod -R ug+rwx /home/glassfish/glassfish/bin/

#others are not allowed to execute/modify/read them
sudo chmod -R o-rwx /home/glassfish/bin/
sudo chmod -R o-rwx /home/glassfish/glassfish/bin/


At this point you can give it a try and start you Glassfish server. But do not forget to stop it again before you continue with the next steps. Here are the commands for starting and stopping Glassfish:

#now switch user to the glassfish user
sudo su glassfish

#start glassfish
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin start-domain domain1
#check the output...

#stop glassfish
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin stop-domain domain1
#check the output...

#exit from glassfish user
exit


4. Setting up an init script

Let's create an init script for now. It helps you to start, stop and restart your Glassfish easily. We also need this to make Glassfish start up automatically whenever Ubuntu is rebooting. The file we need to create is /etc/init.d/glassfish. For starting and stopping Glassfish we will use the asadmin tool that ships with Glassfish (we used it a little in the previous step).
#create and edit file
sudo vi /etc/init.d/glassfish

#(paste the lines below into the file and save it...):

#! /bin/sh

#to prevent some possible problems
export AS_JAVA=/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun

GLASSFISHPATH=/home/glassfish/bin

case "$1" in
start)
echo "starting glassfish from $GLASSFISHPATH"
sudo -u glassfish $GLASSFISHPATH/asadmin start-domain domain1
;;
restart)
$0 stop
$0 start
;;
stop)
echo "stopping glassfish from $GLASSFISHPATH"
sudo -u glassfish $GLASSFISHPATH/asadmin stop-domain domain1
;;
*)
echo $"usage: $0 {start|stop|restart}"
exit 3
;;
esac
:

As you can see Glassfish is started with the user glassfish. It's always a bad idea to run a webserver with root. You should always use a restricted user - in our case this will be the user glassfish. You will learn how to use the script we just created in the next steps.


5. Glassfish autostart: adding init script to default runlevels

The init script is set up. Now we can add it to the default run levels. This way our Glassfish will startup whenever Ubuntu is restarted.
#make the init script file executable
sudo chmod a+x /etc/init.d/glassfish

#configure Glassfish for autostart on ubuntu boot
sudo update-rc.d glassfish defaults

#if apache2 is installed:
#stopping apache2
sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 stop
#removing apache2 from autostart
update-rc.d -f apache2 remove

From now on you can start, stop or restart your Glassfish like this (Ubuntu will also do it this way):

#start
/etc/init.d/glassfish start

#stop
/etc/init.d/glassfish stop

#restart
/etc/init.d/glassfish restart

6. Security configuration before first startup

Even now we should not really use Glassfish in production. We will now begin the configuration of Glassfish itself. You should always run these steps, for example changing the default passwords, enabling https, changing the default ssl certificate to be used for https etc. We will also put our attention on Glassfish obfuscation.

Our first step is to change the master password. Glassfish uses it to protect the domain-encrypted files from unauthorized access, i.e. the certificate store which contains the certificates for https communication. When Glassfish is starting up it tries to read such "secured" files - for exactly this purpose Glassfish needs to be provided with the master password either in an intertactive way or in a non-interactive way. I will choose the non-interactive way because we want our Glassfish to start up on Ubuntu reboot as a deamon (in the Windows world this would be called a service). This is necessary so that the start-domain command can start the server without having to prompt the user. To accomplish this we need to set the savemasterpassword option to true. This option indicates whether the master password should be written to the file system. The file is called master-password and can be found at <DOMAIN-DIR>/config/. To change the master password you have to ensure that Glassfish is not running - only then you can call the command change-master-password which will interactivly ask you for the new password.

#switch user to glassfish (stay with this user for complete Step 6!)
sudo su glassfish

#change master password, default=changeit
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin change-master-password --savemasterpassword=true
#prompt: choose your new master password ==> myMasterPwd

The next step is to change the administration password with change-admin-password. Because this command is a remote command we need to ensure that Glassfish is running before we can execute the command. Since we want "automatic login" we will create an admin password file allowing us to login without being asked for credetials.

#now we have to start Glassfish
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin start-domain domain1

#change admin password
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin change-admin-password
#1. enter "admin" for user (default)
#2. hit enter because default pwd is empty
#3. choose you new pwd ==> myAdminPwd

#login for automatic login...
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin login
#prompt:
#user = admin
#password = myAdminPwd
#==> stores file to /home/glassfish/.asadminpass

#now stop Glassfish
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin stop-domain domain1


Glassfish is coming with two pre-configured certificate which is used for ssl (https). You can see it in the keystore.jks file if you check for the alias s1as. In Glassfish 3.1 there is even another preconfigured certificate available: glassfish-instance. But that also means that everybody else can get these two certificates, the public keys, private keys, etc. With that information you could never be safe because "others" could "read" your data sent to Glassfish via https. That means you should always make sure to replace the pre-configured s1as and glassfish-instance entries in your keystore. But you should not delete them as long as the alias "s1as" and "glassfish-instance" are still in use (and it is by default in use for https...). I faced some strange behaviour as I did not think of that at the beginning when I simply deleted s1as - learn from my mistake and do not delete it for now... But we can help us with generating a new alias first (myAlias) and when ever needed or wanted we could change each occurrence of s1as to myAlias (i.e. via admin console) and then we could finally delete that s1as. The same has to be done also for glassfish-instance.

The following code box shows you the commands we need for modifying our Glassfish keystore. As you can see we first delete our pre-configured s1as entry (Glassfish mustn't be running!). Later a new s1as entry is generated - it is now unique for us! Similar steps have to be executed also for our second certificate (glassfish-instance).

#create new certs
cd /home/glassfish/glassfish/domains/domain1/config/
keytool -list -keystore keystore.jks -storepass myMasterPwd
keytool -delete -alias s1as -keystore keystore.jks -storepass myMasterPwd
keytool -delete -alias glassfish-instance -keystore keystore.jks -storepass myMasterPwd
keytool -keysize 2048 -genkey -alias myAlias -keyalg RSA -dname "CN=nabisoft,O=nabisoft,L=Mannheim,S=Baden-Wuerttemberg,C=Germany" -validity 3650 -keypass myMasterPwd -storepass myMasterPwd -keystore keystore.jks
keytool -keysize 2048 -genkey -alias s1as -keyalg RSA -dname "CN=nabisoft,O=nabisoft,L=Mannheim,S=Baden-Wuerttemberg,C=Germany" -validity 3650 -keypass myMasterPwd -storepass myMasterPwd -keystore keystore.jks
keytool -keysize 2048 -genkey -alias glassfish-instance -keyalg RSA -dname "CN=nabisoft,O=nabisoft,L=Mannheim,S=Baden-Wuerttemberg,C=Germany" -validity 3650 -keypass myMasterPwd -storepass myMasterPwd -keystore keystore.jks
keytool -list -keystore keystore.jks -storepass myMasterPwd

#update cacerts.jks (hint comes from a comment of previous tutorial - thanks!)
keytool -export -alias glassfish-instance -file glassfish-instance.cert -keystore keystore.jks -storepass myMasterPwd
keytool -export -alias s1as -file s1as.cert -keystore keystore.jks -storepass myMasterPwd

keytool -delete -alias glassfish-instance -keystore cacerts.jks -storepass myMasterPwd
keytool -delete -alias s1as -keystore cacerts.jks -storepass myMasterPwd

keytool -import -alias s1as -file s1as.cert -keystore cacerts.jks -storepass myMasterPwd
keytool -import -alias glassfish-instance -file glassfish-instance.cert -keystore cacerts.jks -storepass myMasterPwd


Now we want to enable https for the admin console. Once we have done that we can be sure that nobody can listen to our data sent via https because nobody else has our certificate, i.e. nobody can decrypt our password used for entering the admin console via browser (in case someone cought our data packages). But this is not all we want to do here. We want to change some of the default JVM Options and we want to make our Glassfish not telling too much ("obfuscation").

The first JVM Option we will change is replacing the -client option with the -server option. I expect the java option -server to be the better choice when it comes to performance. I have also decided to change -Xmx512m (Glassfish default) to a higher value: -Xmx2048m. Furthermore I have added -Xms1024m. For more information about these options please check the documentation for the java launcher options.
All JVM Options so far are optional. But at least adding -Dproduct.name="" is a good idea for everyone. If you would not add this then each http/https response will contain a header field like this: Server: GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1
This is some great piece of information for hackers - that's why you should disable it. We do not want Glassfish to talk too much for security reasons!

We also don't want Glassfish to send a header similar to X-Powered-By: Servlet/3.0 JSP/2.2 (GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1 Java/Apple Inc./1.6) because this is telling everyone we are using a Servlet 3.0 container and that we are (of course) using Java etc. So we have to disable sending x-powered-by in the http/https headers - this is accomplished with the last three asadmin commands in the code box below. Now our Glassfish is working in silent mode - it is not telling too much any more. Glassfish obfuscation accomplished.

# the commands here change the file at
# /home/glassfish/glassfish/domains/domain1/config/domain.xml

#first we have to start Glassfish
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin start-domain domain1

# enable https for remote access to admin console
# requests to http://xxx:4848 are redirected to https://xxx:4848
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin set server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.admin-listener.security-enabled=true
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin enable-secure-admin

#change JVM Options
#list current jvm options
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin list-jvm-options
#now start setting some important jvm settings
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin delete-jvm-options -- -client
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin create-jvm-options -- -server
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin delete-jvm-options -- -Xmx512m
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin create-jvm-options -- -Xmx2048m
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin create-jvm-options -- -Xms1024m
#get rid of http header field value "server" (Glassfish obfuscation)
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin create-jvm-options -Dproduct.name=""
#restart to take effect
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin stop-domain domain1
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin start-domain domain1
#what jvm options are configured now?
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin list-jvm-options

#disable sending x-powered-by in http header (Glassfish obfuscation)
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin set server.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-1.http.xpowered-by=false
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin set server.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-2.http.xpowered-by=false
/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin set server.network-config.protocols.protocol.admin-listener.http.xpowered-by=false

#we are done with user glassfish
exit

7. Run Glassfish

Finally we have come to where we wanted. We have installed, secured and configured our Glassfish installation.
#starting glassfish
sudo /etc/init.d/glassfish start

#remove glassfish from autostart
#update-rc.d -f glassfish remove




Comments
  • If you like this tutorial help me to maintain it:
  • And don't forget to let others know about it:
 
 
 
Excellent job!!!
posted by Meziane
Sat Sep 01 13:55:04 CEST 2012

Thanks...

From Brussels (Belgium).
The best tutorial I have ever read ...
posted by Gilberto Martins
Tue May 29 03:42:59 CEST 2012
The best tutorial I have ever read since I started working with Linux. Not only you have detailed each step (for those who are in a hurry, as me), but explained details and why those details.
FANTASTIC, I learned a lot, not only about Glassfish intallation itself, but about a lotta things.
Thank you a lot, and I really hope I will try to make some tutorials in a better way, although I doubt I can write something so well documented.

Excellent job!!!
Thank you!
posted by Alex
Thu Feb 16 16:20:28 CET 2012
This is definitely one of the best documented and thoroughly written tutorial I've ever seen in this context. 
Thank you very much. I'm impressed.
I used this tutorial for the 3.1.1 version and worked great!
posted by Carlos Zamora
Tue Jan 24 05:27:40 CET 2012
It worked excellent!
Thank you very much!
Problem due to openjdk
posted by Chris
Sat Dec 31 02:03:02 CET 2011
Hello,

I have just discovered that I seem to get this message when stopping the server  because I use openjdk instead of the sun jdk. 

So I will solve this first.
Problem stopping the domain
posted by Chris
Sat Dec 31 01:13:16 CET 2011
Hi there,

I have been following the tutorial. First I had a problem that the server did not want to start. It was because of permissions. I have added sudo -u glassfish to all commands and then it worked.

However always when I want to stop the glassfish server it asks me if I want to accept the certificate. Once I answered with yes I get following output:

Do you trust the above certificate [y|N] -->y
It appears that server [localhost:4848] does not accept secure connections. Retry with --secure=false.
CLI306 Warning - server is not running.
Command stop-domain executed successfully.

The server is still running. Does anybody know where the problem could be?

Thanks,
Chris
Port 80
posted by Joerg
Fri Dec 30 19:33:11 CET 2011
Hi, great Post! It is really helpful. 
I needed quite a while to find out, how to run Glassfish on Port 80 without using iptables and not beeing root.
I wrote a little tutorial here:
http://i-netsource.de/wordpress/?p=228
Brilliant
posted by Rick
Fri Sep 09 04:27:15 CEST 2011
I tried a few other tutorials but this is by far the most comprehensive. Thank you.
Great post
posted by mattski
Sat Jul 30 20:50:44 CEST 2011
Thanks for this post, it's been brilliantly useful today when setting up Glassfish and Postgres on Centos6.

Matt
Cannot login online
posted by Beginner
Sat Jul 30 15:14:26 CEST 2011
Hi!
I've changed the pw with the command "/home/glassfish/bin/asadmin change-admin-password" without problems, but when i want to login at http://localhost:4848/ with "admin" and the pw i've set, it always says "Authentication Failed Re-enter your username and password" What shall I do? I've reinstalled it already but it doesn't help!
Please help me :/
Awesome
posted by johnwrf
Fri Jul 29 05:52:37 CEST 2011
This is an excellent tutorial... Thank you so much !

I followed your previous 3.01 tutorial --  could you please tell me if it is difficult to upgrade from 3.01 to 3.11, after following your first tutorial ?  My concern is if I would lose the existing configuration.

Thanks again !

John
Thanks
posted by karu
Sun Jul 17 09:17:20 CEST 2011
Thanks for posting, you have saved me hours work and taught me a thing or two... Cheers!
Great post!
posted by eha
Fri Jun 17 10:26:15 CEST 2011
Thank you for this!  this cleared up a lot!
i have installed glassfish 3.1 but i have problems into console admin of glasffish
posted by naciu
Tue Jun 07 10:06:03 CEST 2011
i have a problem after the installation of glassfsih) .

I have tried add a user at the realm file for work with the tutorial  of security of java glassfsih . 
I have tried add a user into the console admin glassfsih .
http;localhost:4848 
( i have the default admin with no pass)for the glassfsih .
i go into : 
configuration 
server-config
security
relam 
file 
but when tried push the button mange user for creation a new user , i gete the message: "it is a process with long time .. wait .
but it remains blocked and i not got next ......

Like other configuration , the console administration remains blocked .....

help me.

naciu
how to deploy application without admin privileges
posted by George Kobiashvili
Wed May 11 14:55:08 CEST 2011
Thank you for a very good tutorial. 

How can i allow programmer to deploy a new application without giving him admin user and password? is it possible from adminGUI or just give ftp access to application directory and autodeploy new applications? 
Very good
posted by seryeb
Wed May 04 09:58:48 CEST 2011
Great job. A very good and util manual.
Good Job
posted by Todor
Mon May 02 15:00:12 CEST 2011
Thank you for the detailed post! I was having hard times with setting up custom certificate on the admin management page.

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